I’m frequently asked, “how have you been” or “how are you feeling?” or “how was your day?” My most frequent response is a little foggy.”

In an effort to help everyone understand what I am trying to say, I consulted www.merriam-webster.com and looked up fog. This is what I found:

noun \ˈfg, fäg\

: many small drops of water floating in the air above the ground, the sea, etc.

: a state of mental confusion

The second definition, as you may have guessed, is the one that I refer to.

To give you an example, imagine driving down the road. Fog has set in and visibility is obstructed. You can’t see much, you’re cautious of your surroundings because of the dense fog. All of a sudden, you break through to a clearing. You can see all around you. Your vision is clear and you can proceed as normal.

Fortunately, we all don’t have to drive in the fog every day but imagine having that fog in your head, every day, never knowing when it will roll in.
You get up to get something, the fog rolls in, preventing you from remembering where you are or why you’re there.
You’re in the middle of a conversation, the fog rolls in so thick it turns to night, blocking out every thought, rendering you speechless.
You’re driving to a very familiar place, again the fog rolls in and you have no idea where you are. You have to rely on your GPS to tell you where to go.

This isn’t just sporadic or a one-time event. This is every day, several times a day, a typical day. Sometimes the fog is thicker, sometimes less, but it’s ALWAYS there. It’s my Alzheimer’s journey.

So, if you ask me how I’m doing and my answer is, Foggy with a hope of sunshine,” you’ll know what I mean. I remain positive and hopeful that the sunshine will continue to show up and burn away the fog.

Thanks for reading. Hope your day is everything you want and need it to be.

Peace!

4 thoughts on “Fog: It’s Not Just a Weather Condition

  1. Good day! This is my first comment here so I just wanted to give
    a quick shout out and say I truly enjoy reading your articles.
    Can you suggest any other blogs/websites/forums that cover the same topics?

    Thanks a ton!

    Like

  2. Wow Brian — what a fitting analogy. I’ve never seen it presented in quite this manner, but it makes sense. And it certainly helps all of us understand a little better what it feels like to be living with Alzheimer’s.

    Like

  3. Reblogged this on The Long and Winding Road… and commented:
    A brilliant piece by Brian LeBlanc, who is living with young onset Alzheimer’s. When I think back to my mom in terms of what Brian is describing, it all makes sense. The moments of clarity. The fog rolling in and out. Never knowing when it will come… Thank you, Brian, for helping us understand.

    Like

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