As each day begins, we are faced with a decision . . . “Am I going to take the Easy Way or the Hard Way?”

Most of the time, this is an unconscious decision, however, if we are having a rough morning, we may “consciously” ask ourselves that question.

“The pessimist sees difficulty in every opportunity. The optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty.”
— Winston Churchill

For me, it would be very easy to just sleep the day (and night) away and let my Alzheimer’s World just pass me by, not having to face things that normal-brained people don’t even have to think about. For instance, I now have an alarm on my phone that goes off every morning, noon and night to eat. Yes . . . to eat.

On a recent visit from my sister and brother-in-law, my sister noticed I had lost a good bit of weight. She asked about my eating habits and I told her, for the most part, I was eating very healthy. Shannon, my wife, said, “when he remembers to eat.” Hearing it said out loud, I came to the realization that I had been forgetting to eat on a regular basis. You would figure your empty stomach sends a message to your brain that says, “FEED ME!” My stomach probably does that but my brain forgets to tell me.

So in addition to the alarm telling me to eat, it also tells me when to take my medicine(s), when to get on my ALZ Assoc conference calls, when to read my emails, etc. Thank goodness for the alarm function on my iPhone.

“I will always find a lazy person to do a difficult job because he will find an easy way to do it!”
— Bill Gates

Then there are the decisions as to how I will spend my day. Since driving is out of the question (I very rarely drive due to my ability to get lost, which makes me anxious, which makes me not want to drive because I may harm myself or anyone in my truck or other people on the road) I have to think of what I can do to stay productive. With the “Walk to END ALZHEIMER’S” approaching, I tell myself to get outside and walk “Dallas the Dog” to get myself prepared. Sadly, I forget to do it. Ironically, when I do remember, it’s raining. No, it’s not an excuse, it’s just how it is.

Advocating is the one thing I do daily, whether it is a speaking engagement or through Social Media. When I have a speaking engagement, as Shannon says, I come alive. I think it’s because I go into “work mode”, falling back on the times when I was working in the role of my Public Relations role. In a way, Advocating for Alzheimer’s is a Public Relations role for I am educating and making people aware of Alzheimer’s. It becomes second nature to me and there is no thinking involved. It’s when the Advocating is done is when I have issues.

“Nothing in the world is worth having or worth doing unless it means effort, pain, difficulty… I have never in my life envied a human being who led an easy life. I have envied a great many people who led difficult lives and led them well.”
— Theodore Roosevelt

So, in retrospect, for the past 55 years, I guess I have had a pretty easy life. Sure there were hard, tough times (broken bones, 5 knee surgeries, gallbladder removal, divorce(s), 3 heart attacks, back surgery, neck surgery, to name a few) but it was never as hard as it is now. You see, before now, all of my “ailments” were curable. I knew with a little rehab, I would be up and about and continue on. There’s no rehab for Alzheimer’s.

Each day is a rehab day for me. I try so hard to reconstruct the day before. I know I should write things down so I won’t forget but trying to remember to write things down so I can remember them the next day or the next week is hard to remember. It’s quite a conundrum. I sort of know how Bill Murray felt in “Groundhog Day.” Each day, although it’s a new day, seems like the day before yet, with not so many memories. I know that may seem hard to understand, but it’s the best way I know how to explain it.

The Dictionary is the only place that success comes before work. Hard work is the price we must pay for success. I think you can accomplish anything if you’re willing to pay the price.
— Vince Lombardi

So, I will keep plugging along, trying my best to remember things, but I will never give up, i will never stop fighting, and I will NEVER take the easy way!

Until Next Time,
PEACE!

B

2 thoughts on “There’s a Reason it’s Called: Taking the Easy Way

  1. Hello Brian,
    Wanted to let you know that this article will be included in the dementia “Symptom Perspectives” monthly links tonight, October 30, 2015
    https://paper.li/f-1408973778

    I would like to thank you for sharing your lived experience. My hope is that these words and projects can become valuable resources for change in relationships, treatment, and policies.
    Much thanks,
    Tru

    Like

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