Taking Care of Our Own

This post is a bit different from what I normally post. I don’t mean to offend anyone, I’m just passionate about what’s going in our Nation. 

For all the folks that want to open our borders to immigrants from other countries, immigrants who will be supported by us, I have a solution.
Open YOUR home to support these individuals as well as their families, and be responsible for all of their actions. Feed them, clothe them and take of their medical needs. That is what you want for them, right? 
Giving them an opportunity, right? Well, now you can. No, I’m not being negative or prejudice. I’m being real.

With that said . . .

Why not take care of our Veterans who need our care? You remember our Veterans? The ones who fought for our rights and freedoms? Our Veterans who, because of their service to our country make it possible for you to stomp on and burn our Nation’s flag? Our Veterans who have to wait because a non-US citizen “needs” medical treatment because they matter more?

Why not take care of our aging population, the ones who gave us life, the ones that took care of us first?

Why not take care of those of us who have a fatal disease and put those dollars into research, respite care and hospice care?

We need to take care of our own, before we begin to take care of others.

I’m sure you take care of your families first, making sure they have all their needs met. Why can’t we, as a nation, take care of each other first and then, and only then, look to taking care of others?

If you still insist on taking care of others first, let me know. I will gladly take donations to help fight Alzheimer’s Disease, the disease that assisted in taking the lives of many of my loved ones and will ultimately assist in taking my life. There are also other organizations that could also desperately use your help.

If you still insist on taking care of others, open your home to a Veteran, a member of the homeless population, or any other US Citizen that could use some help.

See what needs you can assist with in your own community. There are so many individuals right here in my community that are doing wonderful things for the betterment of the people that live here. They are awesome individuals who do these things, not to call attention to themselves, but because they are fulfilling a need for the individuals that live here.

Now, if you are STILL not satisfied, I’m sure there are many Middle Eastern Countries that will welcome you, as well as your support, with open arms and will even provide you with free housing. It may be cramped, dirty, hot and uncomfortable, but don’t worry, your visit will not last very long.

That is what you want, RIGHT?

Have a Great Day!

The Happiest Place on Earth

The Happiest Place on Earth

Yes, I’m talking about “THE” Happiest Place on Earth, Walt Disneyworld.
However, it’s not for the reasons you may think.

Let me explain . . . I recently came across an article by Sandy Wells of KABC News entitled, New Approach to Treating Alzheimer’s Disease Replicates Life As It was 60 Years Ago.” http://www.kabc.com/2017/01/09/new-approach-to-treating-alzheimers-disease-focuses-on-long-term-memory/

The article talks about “Reminiscence Therapy” 

Here is an excerpt from the Article:
“Specifically, how that works, and what it has shown is reminiscence therapy really reduces agitation, improves mood and improves sleep quality, all of which are major factors when you’re dealing with the challenges of facing Alzheimer’s Disease. When you think about Town Square, really, what it is, is a complete, immersive environment that’s designed around a 1950’s – 1960’s time period, specifically from 1953 to 1961.

For those of you that don’t know the in’s and out’s of Alzheimer’s Disease, the first thing to go is the short-term memories. It’s why I have trouble remembering things from day to day, week to week, etc . . . However, talk to me about things from the 60’s, 70’s and 80’s, I’m as clear as a bell. So I think it’s awesome that a Town Square atmosphere is going to be built specifically for Individuals with Alzheimer’s in mind. It will put them in an environment where they are comfortable, non-anxious and happy.

So what does this have to do with WDW? I knew you would ask that question sooner or later, so I am prepared to tell you.

My first time going to WDW was in 1976. At that time the park was only 5 years old and the Magic Kingdom was all there was. Since that time, I have been back at least 15-20 times. I’ve lost count. I have seen it grow from just 1 park to 4 and I have been so many times, I know where everything is.

The last time I was there was in September. Shannon surprised me with a trip for my birthday. We had such a wonderful time.
One thing that stood out, and still does, was when we were waiting for the Wishes Nighttime Spectacular (the fireworks). Shannon had to go to the restroom so I stayed where we had found a good spot. Several minutes later, Shannon called to tell me she was lost and couldn’t find me. She was more worried about me than being lost. I talked to her to find out her location and I knew right where she was. I told her to look for the light. I turned on my phone’s flashlight and held it up, shining it in her direction. She saw it and followed it back to me.

She asked me, “How did you know where I was? How did you know to hold up the light?”  I had no answer for her. I couldn’t explain it other than to say, “I don’t know, I just knew.”

 On our last day there Shannon and I were talking about how much fun we had and then, she told me this . . .
“Since we have been here, you have shown no signs of Alzheimer’s, you didn’t talk about Alzheimer’s and you didn’t talk to anyone about Alzheimer’s. You even found “ME” when “I” was lost. You were who you used to be and I want you to hold onto that.”


With that said, she took me to the ticket counter and upgraded my park pass to an Annual Pass. She said, “I want you to come back here as often as you can, take as many photos as you like and just be who you used to be.”  I didn’t know what to say. I was elated, emotional, speechless. I didn’t think it was possible to fall more in love with her than I already had, but I did. And no, it wasn’t because she was giving me this gift, it was the reason why she was giving me this gift. She wanted me to feel normal.She wanted me to feel how I used to feel. She wanted me to have the clearest, non-foggy mind I could possibly have in a place I knew so well.

On the ride back home, I thought a lot. I tried to think as to why WDW transported me back to an earlier, normal-brained time. I knew part of it was because I had visited there so many times that everything was familiar. However, something just didn’t click. I was still unsure . . . until I spoke with my sister.

One day, on a phone call with Linda, I was telling her about the gift Shannon had given me. I told how it made me feel being back in WDW. Then I explained to her about not being able to clearly understand why I felt that connection, that is, until she asked me a very simple question . . . “Don’t they play music all through the park?”

When she asked that question, a wave of emotion washed over me, just as it is now. I started hearing the sounds, the musical sounds of  WDW, in my head. It wasn’t a particular sound or a particular song,  it was just the most beautiful, joyous, happy sound I’ve ever heard. Linda, reminded me of my love of music and how musical therapy (listening to your favorite songs from years gone by) can transport you back to a particular time and place. All the pieces of the puzzle fit together and I finally had the answer to my question I had been pondering since September.

I’m not sure why I didn’t think of the music but then again, I’m not sure what I think or don’t think anymore. 

The reason I am bringing this up now is next week, I will be in Orlando to be on a panel for the The National AT Aging and Dementia Decision Tree Workshop. I am going there a little early so I can make a quick visit to WDW. Call it being a “kid at heart” or call it “just wanting to feel normal.” I just want to be who I was before Alzheimer’s came along and robbed me of so many things.

Thank you Shannon, for giving me a gift of love, a gift of happiness, a gift of normalcy. Whether you are there with me or I’m by myself, you will ALWAYS be in my heart.

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Until next time . . . “Have a Magical Day!”

B

58 … 11,370 … 1,000%

I know you’re probably looking at the title of this blog post wondering what it means. I promise I’ll tell you, but first, I would like to (I’m trying to think of the word that means to look back on certain events but not only can I not figure out the word, I can hardly remember yesterday, so I will just say . . . ) look back on 2016.

2016 was a very busy year for me. I can’t remember a time in my professional work life when I was this busy. All I can say is, it was a different kind of busy. Being that I’m not able to hold down a 8 – 5 salaried job doesn’t mean I’m sitting back in my recliner with Dallas (my dog) eating ice cream and watching daytime talk shows. (by the way, have y’all seen Harry, the new show with Harry Connick, Jr.? It’s  on Mon -Fri @2pm CST, on ABC. Just sayin’.)
Where was I . . . Oh yeah, 2016.

Working with several organizations (ALZ Assoc AL/FL Panhandle, National ALZ Assoc Early-Stage Advisory Group, Dementia Action Alliance, Covenant Alzheimer’s Care, Dementia Alliance International) keeps me busy. And no, I’m not complaining.
Busy =  Engaged Brain . . . Stagnant = Fog. I’ll take an engaged brain any day.

This brings me to the first number in the title . . . 58
58 
is the number of presentations I took part in during 2016. Yes, with only 52 weeks in the year, there were times when I doubled up in a week and even in a day. I didn’t care. I did what I was asked to do without question. In my mind, it was another opportunity to spread Dementia Awareness. It was another opportunity to demystify the Stigma associated with Dementia, especially Early-Onset Dementia.

No matter where I go, people still associate Dementia as that of a disease of the elderly. When I stand at the podium and tell the audience, “I’m 56 years old and I have Early-Onset Alzheimer’s Disease”, the reaction, the looks on people’s faces is consistent. It’s that of surprise, shock, and yes, disbelief. I get comments like, “My Mother / Father / Grandmother / Grandfather had Dementia and they couldn’t speak, let alone stand up in front of an audience like you do and talk about their life wth Alzheimer’s. I ask the age of their loved one and they are/were considerably older than me. I take that as an opportunity to talk about my life and the lives of hundreds of thousands of others who have Early-Stage Dementia and are able to live somewhat of a full life.

I also have people tell me how “brave” I am to talk about my life with Alzheimer’s Disease. Military personnel, Law Enforcement Officer’s, Fire Fighters and others who put their lives on the line every day are who I consider brave. I’m just a guy with Alzheimer’s Disease who can still talk about what it’s like to live with the disease. As I say in my presentation, “Alzheimer’s: Up Close and Personal”, “I don’t try to paint a rosy picture of what it’s like to live with this disease for if I did, you would not understand what we go through on a daily basis.” Although I don’t consider myself “brave”, I do thank them for the compliment. My Momma taught me to be kind.

My Dementia Advocacy isn’t just restricted to the AL/FL Panhandle. I also go to different places in the U.S. That’s what brings me to the second number in the title, 11,370.
That number represents the number of miles I have traveled by air and highway during 2016. To give you a breakdown, 5,836 were the number of air miles, leaving a balance of 5,534 representing the number of highway miles. The air miles weren’t shocking since I made a number of trips to Washington, DC and Chicago, but the highway miles are what really surprised me. 

One of the most memorable moments was during a presentation in Washington DC at the National Academies of Sciences • Engineering • Medicine for the “Preventing Dementia and Cognitive Impairment Workshop”.

I was asked to speak at the workshop, to give an abbreviated presentation of my “Alzheimers: Up Close and Personal” presentation. Looking at the other presenters, they were Ph.D’s. CEO’s, MD’s and then there was me. The only abbreviations I could think of to go behind my name was ALZ, which is how I introduced myself. 

Being that my presentation was scheduled for later in the afternoon, I was able to listen to the other presenters. It was a bit intimidating due to their Scientific, Medical, and Professional backgrounds but I knew I would be presenting from a first person point of view, talking about myself rather than someone or some thing.

When it came time to speak, I walked up to the podium. To the left of me was a wall of windows. Right before I started to speak, I looked out the window and there was the Lincoln Memorial. It was such a surreal moment. A feeling of calmness came over me as I started my presentation. During my 15-minute allotted time frame, I glanced at Mr. Lincoln’s Memorial several times. I not only felt proud to be there, but I felt as if I were representing the millions of people living in the United States who were living with Dementia. At the conclusion of my presentation, the unthinkable happened. The entire room stood up and gave me a standing ovation. No one else, the entire day, received that type of acknowledgment. What a memorable moment that was, memorable enough to stay with me. 

My local advocacy has put me in front of audiences numbering in the 20’s and 30’s to 100’s. Each time, I share my “first person point-of-view” as to what it’s like Living with Alzheimer’s each and every day.
Although I’ve spoken to Medical Professionals, Civic Organizations and Caregivers, the one group that affects me in the most emotional way are the Law Enforcement Officers. Each and every day, these men and women put on their uniforms and then put their lives on the line. That’s what I call bravery! 

chevy-police-vehicle

Through Crisis Intervention Team Training, I speak to them as well as teach them as to how to identify people Living with a Dementia-Related Illness, individuals they may come into contact with each and every day. Again, I speak from personal experiences of public confusion, disorientation, broken or unintelligible speech, etc. to give them an idea of what to look for. They ask very good questions and don’t mind if the presentation goes over the allotted time.

Most of them, as do most of the audiences I speak to, have a connection to a family member or friend who has had or has a Dementia-Related Illness.
Most of them have already had experiences with individuals with a Dementia-Related Illness and will now interact with these individuals differently and in a more positive way.

And this brings me to the last number in the title, 1,000%, which is what I give to everything Alzheimer’s.
Whether it’s:
   – preparing/updating one of my presentations
   – presenting to a small, medium or large audience
   – making sure my family knows how much I appreciate what they do for me, day in and day out

I make sure I give it my all.

I give 1,000% for I don’t know when I won’t be able to do this any longer.
When my time comes, I want to know that:
– I gave everything I had to give.
– no matter how big or small, I made a difference
– I gave people a better understanding of what it’s like to “Live with Alzheimer’s”
– I played a part in the destigmatization of Dementia
– people are now aware that Dementia is NOT just a disease of the elderly
– I helped people realize and understand that just because someone has Dementia does  not mean that it’s the end of all things.

There is still so much work to be done. There is still so much Dementia awareness and education to be shared.  I’m hoping 2017 will be a breakthrough.
Whether or not that happens, I will continue my travels and will continue giving 1,000%!

PEACE,
B

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