Part II So . . . You Think I’m Faking my Alzheimer’s Disease, do you?

Part II      So . . . You Think I’m Faking my Alzheimer’s Disease, do you?

After writing the first post earlier in the week, I received so many comments here, on Facebook, Messenger, Twitter, texts and e-mail that were all very positive. I appreciated everything each of you had to say. What I came to realize in conversations with some folks was, I wasn’t alone of being accused of FAKING a Dementia-Related Illness. It broke my heart that so many other people have gone through the same scenario I did. Then, I received a phone call from a good friend of mine (who also doesn’t look like or act like he has Alzheimer’s). We talked for a long time and we discussed so many things related to my recent blog post. I knew then that I was going to have to do a Part II based upon the information we discussed. So, without further ado . . .

PART II (hey, that rhymed with ado! It’s amazing what a person with Alzheimer’s can do!)

I will start with a quote from the Invisible Disabilities Association

“In general, the term disability is often used to describe an ongoing physical challenge. This could be a bump in life that can be well managed or a mountain that creates serious changes and loss. Either way, this term should not be used to describe a person as weaker or lesser than anyone else! Every person has a purpose, special uniqueness, and value, no matter what hurdles they may face.

In addition, just because a person has a disability, does not mean they are disabled. Many living with these challenges are still fully active in their work, families, sports or hobbies. Some with disabilities are able to work full or part time but struggle to get through their day, with little or no energy for other things. Others are unable to maintain gainful or substantial employment due to their disability, have trouble with daily living activities and/or need assistance with their care.”

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/InvisibleDisabilities/

Twitter: @InvDisabilities
Web: https://invisibledisabilities.org

When I wrote Part I, I had no knowledge of the Invisible Disabilities Association which is why I listed their information above. You should really go take a look!

I also failed to mention in Part 1 that I have Type II Diabetes and Heart Disease (3 heart attacks, 2 stents). I mention these 2 diseases since they are Dementia-Related Illnesses. Along with the genetics from my Great-Grandmother, Maternal Grandfather and Mother, (all who died with Alzheimer’s) you throw my Father into the mix (who died with Vascular Dementia) and he, along with my Mother, passed along the ApoE4 protein to me, the chances of me NOT developing Alzheimer’s were pretty slim.  

Even with all that, I’m faking. 

I’ve also had about a dozen surgeries in my life yet none of these issues EVER came into question from anyone. No one ever said to me, “You don’t look like you have Diabetes” or “You don’t look like you’ve had 3 heart attacks” or You don’t lok like you’ve had that many surgeries.”
SO, WHY THE ACCUSATIONS OF FAKING ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE??? 

I shake my head in disbelief for I wouldn’t even know HOW to fake Alzheimer’s.

To put it plainly, living with this disease is no picnic. It really sucks.
The hardest part of Living with Alzheimer’s, at least for me, is knowing you have a fatal disease that one day will contribute to your death. However, you can’t think about it all the time for it’s really a depressing subject. So, you suck it up because the last thing you want to do is to affect your family in any type of negative way.  But remember, we have Alzheimer’s and we forget and, unbeknownst to us, we do bring it up, and that sucks even worse.

I think I’ve said this before but it’s worth saying again . . .
“I don’t try to paint a rosy picture of Living with Alzheimer’s because there’s nothing rosy about it.”
It would be an insult to myself as well as to anyone who is currently living with the Disease or who’s life has already ended because of the Disease if I tried to make it sound any other way than what it actually is.

“But you LOOK good”
“You just want attention”
“But you don’t LOOK sick”

https://invisbledisabilities.org


How many times have we heard this? I know this statement has been uttered to individuals with all types of diseases that can’t be seen. You see, when someone breaks their arm or leg, they get a cast. 
If someone cuts themselves, they get a bandage. If someone has surgeries, they have scars.

Alzheimer’s is invisible. It can’t really be seen, however, it can be seen through our unsteady actions, through the way we sometimes stutter while trying to find our words, or, during conversations when we start repeating ourselves.

Then, if they’re paying attention, they know something isn’t right. 

When I first started advocating, I actually talked about Alzheimer’s being invisible. I told my audience, “it would be easier if we all dressed in purple and had a cool-looking cape with a big A on it. Besides looking “hero-ish” people would then know we have Alzheimer’s.” (Based on that is where I came up with my Twitter name “The ALZ Guy”. I pictured myself standing on a stage wearing my purple, Super Hero-ish costume, and starting my presentation with my hands on my hips, saying in my best Batman voice, “I’M ALZHEIMER’S GUY!”
OK, now that you know I have a very vivid imagination, I’ll move on.

I guess what I’m trying to say is, you can’t control what other people think or what other people say. When it comes to Alzheimer’s or other Dementia-Related Illnesses, there is so much that is unknown, people don’t know how to react.
Sometimes they will say negative things for they think are correct or factual.
Sometimes they will say negative things because they can’t/won’t accept the truth that you have a fatal disease.
And sadly, sometimes they will say negative things just out of meanness or jealousy, you know, just because they think you’re faking it just to get attention.

The only thing you are able to control in this situation is you. People can say what they want but it’s up to you whether or not you let the words harm you. Don’t get me wrong, the words sting, but, probably the one good thing about those of us living with Dementia,
WE’LL FORGET WHAT THEY SAID . . . unless of course, we’re faking!

Until Next Time,

PEACE
B

So . . . You Think I’m Faking my Alzheimer’s Disease, do you?

So . . . You Think I’m Faking my Alzheimer’s Disease, do you?

Imagine my amazement when through recent conversations with some close acquaintances, I was told that there are individuals who think I am FAKING my Alzheimer’s Disease. Yeah, I know, right?

First off, HOW IN THE HELL DO YOU FAKE ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE???

  • I’ve had brain scans. Did I manipulate them by turning my brain off, not thinking anything while in the scanner?
  • I’ve been diagnosed, not once, not twice, not thrice, but 4 freakin’ times
    by a Neurologist, a Neuropsychiatrist, and two Neuropsychologists (appointed by the Social Security Administration, who by the way, declines benefits until no stone is unturned). Did I fake not remembering how to draw a clock or another type of shape?  Did I fake remembering the 4 words I was told 5 minutes ago?
  • Do I fake every day not remembering things from 1 minute, 1 hour or 1 day ago
  • I’ve had my driving privileges taken away by my Dr. for it was determined I no longer have the cognitive abilities or proper reaction time to operate a vehicle. Did I fake that too?

BOGUS

WOW . . . if I was faking all this, I must be a pretty damn good faker to have come up with this diabolical plan. But wait, if I was actually faking it, wouldn’t that take someone who can think and remember what to do, day in and day out, so they could remember to keep “faking it?”

Could someone:

  • who has no clue what day it is
  • who cannot tell time on a non-digital watch
  • who has to have alerts on his phone to remind him to take his medicine, to eat and to bathe every day
  • who can’t remember, day to day, how to work a TV remote

Could someone who is Cognitively Impaired really carry out this plan?

Oh wait, I get it . . . I’m supposed to be curled up in a bed, not able to talk intelligently, not able to feed myself or go to the bathroom by myself, and not remember my wife and children. God forbid, should I be able to use a laptop to write blog posts that will hopefully bring awareness and education to people who don’t understand the in’s and out’s of Living with Alzheimer’s Disease that they only saw in their elderly parents and grandparents.

GEEEEZZZZ, I guess since I’m able to do all of these things, maybe all of those so called medical professionals, all 4 of them, plus their PA’s and NP’s, all with their Diplomas and Certificates and published articles are just full of shit!

Maybe they have a quota as to how many people they have to diagnose with a Dementia-Related Illness each month and they needed just one more to be awarded the monthly “Hey, You Diagnosed Some Poor Sucker with a Fatal Illness Who Wasn’t  Really Sick” award, and I was the lucky one.
Maybe they (all 4 Dr’s, PA’s and NP’s) deliberately lied to me just to turn my life and my family’s life inside out and upside down, all the while so they can collect a $35 co-pay so they have some spending money for lunch!
Wow, did they pull the wool over my eyes, or what?

FAKE

I’ve been open and honest about my Alzheimer’s life since the day I was diagnosed. When I talk about it, I don’t do it to make people feel sorry for me, to have pity on me or to call attention to myself.
If I did that, I’d be dishonoring the lives of my Grandfather, my Mother and Father, or my wife’s Grandmother.
If I did that, I’d be making a mockery of every person in the world who has Alzheimer’s Disease, whether they be over or under the age of 65, individuals who I now call a friend.
If I did that, I’d be purposely putting my wife and children through sheer, underserving, inexcusable, wretched hell.

Well, I don’t have the capability to do something like that. 

I’m not saying I’m perfect for I have many faults and I’ve made many mistakes in my life that I’ve paid dearly for, but I’m not evil!

So, for those of you who want to continue thinking I’m faking my illness, please go right ahead. You have the right to think and say what you want. You can’t hurt me anymore than what I’ve already been. We don’t talk or see each other so it’s not like I’m missing out on anything.

Since receiving my “diagnosis” I’ve become non-existent to you, well, except to be called a fake, not to my face of course.

So please, continue your path in life and feel good about yourself. It must be nice to sit upon your throne and pass judgment upon those of us, you feel, are just skating through life.

Yeah, I’m skating alright. Of course, I can no longer skate on my own (guess I’m faking that too) but I’ve got Shannon (and her family), Asheton, Bradley, Linda and so many others holding me up both physically and emotionally when I need it. Unfortunately, I’ve been needing their assistance more and more lately but they are always there. I know I’m fortunate to have them, and yes, I know who YOU are, and I NEVER take it for granted.

They understand what I go through every day. They see and talk to me on good days, bad days and all days in between, because they get it and I am so thankful for that.

Feel free to call them and ask them if I’m “faking it”.
Better yet, just call Shannon. She would just loooooove to talk to some of you.
Just be prepared though, she’s kinda protective of me.

Until Next Time . . .

PEACE,
B