“Hey, Alexa . . . THANK YOU!”

“Hey, Alexa . . . THANK YOU!”

The Amazon Echo Dot can assist individuals with a dementia-related illness get through the day a little bit better. At a time when some folks are going tech-free, I’m discovering technology is actually helping me to live a better life.

Alexa

 


(I am in no way associated with Amazon and I have not been compensated in any way to write about the Amazon Echo Dot.

 

My reasoning for writing this is two-fold: 
1) while I appreciate humor, there is a fine line between laughing with people and laughing at people. 
2) I want to point on out how this device can really help those of us living with a disability, including cognitive decline.

Recently, I saw a Saturday Night Live skit regarding, as they put it, “people of a certain age” using the Amazon Echo Dot.  At first, I thought it was going to be funny. That ended when I realized they were actually making fun of older adults experiencing hearing loss and cognitive decline.
I’m including a link to the skit so you can make the determination on your own. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YvT_gqs5ETk

After watching the skit, I know some of you will find it funny and some of you will not.
In reading the comments made about the skit, I found one to be enlightening.

It read, “Laughing at the video. Then I realized this is video is about me in 30-40 years.”
How true those words may be. I sincerely hope, for this young man’s sake, they don’t come true.

Anyway, this post is not about SNL, this is about the Amazon Echo Dot and how I believe it can assist individuals with a dementia-related illness get through the day a little bit better.
At a time when some folks are going tech-free, I’m discovering technology is actually helping me to live a better life.

“The Amazon Echo Dot is a device that uses speech recognition to perform an ever-growing range of tasks on command. Amazon calls the built-in brains of this device “Alexa,” and she is the thing that makes it work. Her real smarts are on the Internet, in the cloud-computing service run by Amazon. The name Alexa can be changed by the user to “Amazon”, “Echo” or “Computer”.”
Amazon Echo Dot info

 

If you don’t know what the Amazon Echo Dot does, here’s how I use mine:

  • I use Amazon Echo Dot for a lot of things, like setting alarms to eat, reminders to take a bath, tell me the weather forecast … she will usually understand what you are trying to ask. If she doesn’t, she will let you know.
  • It can hear you from across the room or from upstairs with voice recognition, even while music is playing
  • I haven’t gotten to this point yet but if you really want to get fancy, you can purchase additional components that will allow you to control lights, switches, thermostats, etc. 

For those of us who are living well with a dementia-related illness, we may find ourselves being a bit more forgetful than what we used to be. I will only speak for myself and what I go through, for most of us have similar symptoms, but are affected in different ways.

One of the things I most like is the news feature, or “flash briefing”. Just say, “Hey Alexa, read me the news!” and she does, giving you headlines from all over. If you want her to stop, just say, “Alexa, stop reading news” or some other form of a command. My favorite is, “Alexa, when is the next Saints game” and she tells me the date and time. “WHO DAT!!!”

Alexa will also play music from your Amazon Prime Music selection. You choose the genre or something from your own personal playlist and she will play it. For example, at this time of year, I say, “Alexa, play Christmas music!” (I sometimes ask please without even thinking. I think she appreciates it!)

Although I have alarms and reminders on my phone to alert me as to what I should be doing at a particular time, I also use Alexa to remind me verbally. For example, I’ll say, “Alexa, remind me at 1:00pm to get ready for my speaking engagement at the Alzheimer’s Association at 2:30pm.!” She says it verbally and also sends a message to my phone. (by the way, if I don’t say am or pm, she will ask me.)

There are many other features the Amazon Echo Dot uses but I just wanted to highlight some of the features I use most often. Since this is the holiday season, for only $29.99, this would be a great gift for someone who may be starting to have some memory decline, someone who has had a dementia-related illness diagnosis or just something to have handy to make your life a little less complicated. Just an FYI, it also has a built-in bedtime story function for the kids . . . or even for you!

As a side note, you may also want to check with your cable provider. Their new remotes are now voice enabled. If you’re like me, I remember the network but I forget the channel number. Now, I just press the little microphone thingy (yes, that’s a real term, at least in my vocabulary), and say “NBC” or “FOX NEWS” or “HGTV” or “ESPN” and it goes directly to that station.

As I go further along my Alzheimer’s path, I’m always looking for ways to make my life a little less complicated. When I find something that works, I put on my Dementia Advocate hat (yes I have one but only wear it in private)  and share it with as many people as I can. I know that it may not work for everyone but if it works for a few, then . . . HOORAY!

As far as SNL goes, I know they will continue making fun of people. It’s what they do. I just hope they keep in mind that when they make fun of people with cognitive issues, it’s really not that funny.

Until next time . . .
PEACE and Merry Christmas!

~ Brian
“I have Alzheimer’s BUT it doesn’t have me,
for I don’t allow it to define who I am!”